Historical GHG Emissions: Agriculture Across All Regions

  • strict warning: Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically in /hermes/bosnaweb19a/b696/ipg.chicagoclimateonline/sites/all/modules/views/views.module on line 906.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_handler_argument::init() should be compatible with views_handler::init(&$view, $options) in /hermes/bosnaweb19a/b696/ipg.chicagoclimateonline/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_argument.inc on line 744.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_plugin_style_default::options() should be compatible with views_object::options() in /hermes/bosnaweb19a/b696/ipg.chicagoclimateonline/sites/all/modules/views/plugins/views_plugin_style_default.inc on line 24.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_plugin_row::options_validate() should be compatible with views_plugin::options_validate(&$form, &$form_state) in /hermes/bosnaweb19a/b696/ipg.chicagoclimateonline/sites/all/modules/views/plugins/views_plugin_row.inc on line 134.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_plugin_row::options_submit() should be compatible with views_plugin::options_submit(&$form, &$form_state) in /hermes/bosnaweb19a/b696/ipg.chicagoclimateonline/sites/all/modules/views/plugins/views_plugin_row.inc on line 134.
  • strict warning: Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically in /hermes/bosnaweb19a/b696/ipg.chicagoclimateonline/sites/all/modules/views/views.module on line 906.
  • strict warning: Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically in /hermes/bosnaweb19a/b696/ipg.chicagoclimateonline/sites/all/modules/views/views.module on line 906.
  • strict warning: Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically in /hermes/bosnaweb19a/b696/ipg.chicagoclimateonline/sites/all/modules/views/views.module on line 906.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_handler_filter::options_validate() should be compatible with views_handler::options_validate($form, &$form_state) in /hermes/bosnaweb19a/b696/ipg.chicagoclimateonline/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_filter.inc on line 607.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_handler_filter::options_submit() should be compatible with views_handler::options_submit($form, &$form_state) in /hermes/bosnaweb19a/b696/ipg.chicagoclimateonline/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_filter.inc on line 607.
  • strict warning: Declaration of views_handler_filter_boolean_operator::value_validate() should be compatible with views_handler_filter::value_validate($form, &$form_state) in /hermes/bosnaweb19a/b696/ipg.chicagoclimateonline/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_filter_boolean_operator.inc on line 159.

Key GHG emissions resulting from agricultural production are CO2, CH4, and N20. CO2 results from microbial decay or the burning of organic matter. CH4 results from the decomposition of organic matter, for example from stored manures or rice grown in flooded conditions.  N2O is generated by the transformation of nitrogen in soil and manure.

Agriculture currently accounts for approximately 10-12% of global anthropogenic GHG emissions (estimated in 2005). CH4 and N2O emissions resulting from agriculture are estimated at 47% and 58% of the anthropogenic total.  The agricultural sector induces large fluxes in global CO2 levels, but the net flux is small. CO2 emissions resulting from agriculture are estimated at less than 1% of the anthropogenic total.On a global level, CH4 and N2O emissions from agricultural production increased 17% from 1990 to 2005. Both gasses increased at approximately the same rate. N2O emissions are predicted to increase 35-60% by 2030 due to increased usage of nitrogen based fertilizers and increased animal manure production. CH4 emissions may rise up to 60% if trends in livestock production continue.

The main drivers of emissions growth in the agricultural sector are population pressure (positive relationship), technological change (negative relationship), economic growth (positive relationship), and public policies (negative relationship). Growth in land productivity is anticipated to continue, though with decreasing returns from improvements in technology. Increasing demand for meat induces changes in land use (e.g. forest to grassland) that often cause increases in CO2 emissions.